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Note: This resource is part of the STAO Grade Six Space Unit User Guide. Click here to access the parent resource.

Life in Space

Unit Curriculum and Assessment Plan

Unit/Strand:
S&T – Grade 6: Space
Topic:
Earth and our Relationship with our Sun and Moon.
Timeline:
2 to 3 weeks
END OF TOPIC CULMINATING TASK(S)
Expectations/Big Ideas:

Space is a hostile environment.

Students will understand and appreciate the the differences of working and living in space versus working and living on earth, including space EVA hazards and biological and psychological changes and adaptations to microgravity

Students will appreciate how space technology has impacted their daily lives.

Students will learn the general parts of a space suit and how the space suit protects astronauts during EVA’s

Description of task:

Students will be designing and building a model of their own space station, Your Space Station (YSS). Their goal is to create a space station in which all components fit aboard the Space Shuttle and require the least number of trips.

Download: Building a Human Presence in Space

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Assessment Tool:

Rubric – will evaluate understanding and communication skills

Checklist – will evaluate students’ ability to meet identified criteria of an effective scientific response

Assessment Criteria/ Look Fors:

  • Understanding the conditions of outer space
  • Understanding of the conditions required to live and work in space
  • Ability to express and organize ideas and information
  • Including of all required components of an effective communication response
BIG IDEAS
Space is a hostile environment. In order to survive and work in the vacuum of space, humans must be supplied with the necessities of life (air, water, food, energy) and be protected against radiation and meteorite impacts. Working in a space environment (e.g. microgravity) affects the human body
SUMMARY OF CONTENT
In space, there are extremes of temperature, high-energy particles and radiation from the sun, no atmosphere or atmospheric pressure. Living organisms must therefore be protected within a spacecraft or space suit. They must have a source of energy (solar panels or batteries), supplies of oxygen, water, and food. These must be carried into space, or recycled from waste products on board. The cramped, micro-gravity environment of a spacecraft has potentially harmful physiological and psychological effects on humans.
CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS
2.5 use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space)

3.3 explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space (e.g., obtaining air, water, and food and managing bodily functions)

3.4 identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration (e.g., telescopes, spectroscopes, spacecraft, life-support systems)

ENABLING LESSONS LEADING UP TO THE CULMINATING TASK
Lesson Goal(s) and/or Focus of Instruction
Description of Student task
Diagnostic or Formative Assessment
Assessment tool
How will you know when each child has reached the goals? Assessment Criteria/Look Fors:
1D Students complete a diagnostic questionnaire to determine prior knowledge and misconceptions they bring into the key learning of the unit about living in space
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Read the diagnostic questionnaires submitted by students. Record major misconceptions as well as areas of strength for both individuals as well as the group.

Download: Living In Space diagnostic

2D Perform the Living in Space Power Point for your students the first class period. The Power Point will stimulate interest and excitement among your students and inspire them for their lab activities

Powerpoint: Living In Space

Video: Where Does Space Begin

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3D A natural beginning to learning about living in space is to learn about the environment that the astronauts would be living in.

To get an overview about the space environment, the teacher will show Our World – Living Conditions in Space

Video: Our World – Living Conditions in Space

The teacher will show the video of the vacuum of space, and complete the demonstration. This will show the students how living and working in the vacuum of space is hazardous to humans.

Video: What does the Vacuum of Space Look Like?

Download: Living in a Vacuum Teacher Demonstration

The teacher will then show the video What is the Temperature of Space

Video: What is the Temperature of Space

PDF: Post Video Discussion and Activities

Finally, the students will complete the Exit Card – Space Environment

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Download: Exit Card Space Environment

4D Students will explore how the body changes in space.
Initially the teacher will show the video, How Does Your Body Change in Space? and Fluid Shift

Video: How Does Your Body Change in Space?

Video: Fluid Shift

Then the students will participate in two labs.

The first lab, the students will watch the video, Fluid Shift and then complete the experiment, Get A Let Up, students will simulate the fluid shift felt by astronauts upon entering space, and analyze data by comparing pre and post collection.

Download: Get A Leg Up – Student

Download:Get A Leg Up Educator

The second lab, The Rotating Chair Experiment, the students will to study how rotational effects might be perceived differently during space flight. (Focus 7; Student Investigation 7.1)

Download: NSBRI Rotating Chair – Student

Link: Human Physiology in Space

 

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At the end of the activity, Get A Leg Up, students complete a series of questions included in the Get A Leg Up – Student

At the end of the activity, The Rotating Chair Experiment – Student Investigation 7.1, the students complete a series of questions.

5D Students explore how it is to sleep in space. First they will watch three videos; Our World – Sleeping in Space, Sleeping in Space and Living in Space.

Video: Our World – Sleeping in Space

Video: Sleeping in Space

Video: Living in Space

The students will then complete the activity ZZZZZ – Sleep On It where they research their own sleep pattern and how it effects their health.

Activity: ZZZZZ Sleep on it

Resource: Sleep and Daily Rhythms

 

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Students can complete the activity, Sleepy Time (page 11, from Sleep and Daily Rhythms) to examine their sleep patterns

and

Catching ZZZZZ’s (page 28, from Sleep and Daily Rhythms) to examine how astronauts sleep in space.

4D This lesson focuses on exercising in space and it’s importance

Video: Our World: Exercising in Space

Video: Our World: Exercising Equipment In Space

First, students will complete an experiment, The Shape of Things (Activity 1 from Muscles and Bones)

Second, the students will watch Our World: Exercising in Space, and Our World: Exercise Equipment in Space

Finally, students will complete Muscles and Bones in Space (Activity 10 from Muscles and Bones)

Download: TG N MB

NASA Fit Explorers Challenge (Train like an Astronaut)

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Students will answer the questions at the end of the activity, The Shape of Things.

Students will complete the answer sheet at the end of the activity Muscles and Bones in Space.

5D This lesson focuses on eating in space and it’s importance

Initially, students will watch the video Our World – Space Grub. They can also watch a selection of videos from Living in Space – Food webpage.

Video: Our World – Space Grub

Video: Living in Space – Food

***PLEASE REVIEW THIS ACTIVITY CAREFULLY FOR POTENTIAL FOOD ALLERGIES***

The first activity the students will complete is Food For Spaceflight, which will help students select and compare foods for spaceflight suitability, and package them for spaceflight.

Video: Food In Space

Activity: Food for Spaceflight – Student

Activity: Food for Spaceflight – Educator

The second activity, Have Food Will Travel, the students design a nutritionally balanced diet for long-duration space flight

Activity: Have Food Will Travel

Finally, the students complete an exit card for this lesson.

Additional Resource: Space Food and Nutrition

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Students will complete the questions at the end of the Food for Spaceflight activity.

Students will also plan a 10-day rotating menu for a long-duration space flight.

6D In this lesson, student explore space wear.

Students initially watch three videos, Importance of Spacesuits, Our World – Spacesuits, and How Can You Gross Out Your Friends With A Spacesuit? If there is additional time, students can watch additional videos from the Living In Space – Space Wear site.

Video: Importance of Spacesuits

Video: Our World – Spacesuits

Video: How Can You Gross Out Your Friends With a SpaceSuit?

Students participate in several activities to see the need of spacesuits.

Activity: The Need for Spacesuits

The students should research the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit from Suited for Spacewalking(page 21)

Activity: Suited for Spacewalking

The students will complete a design challenge and construct a protective garment that will permit humans to venture safely into outer space and perform work.

Link: Living in Space – Space Wear

In addition, students can read an article on donning a spacesuit

Article: Donning a spacesuit article

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Students will design and build a protective garment that will permit future space travelers to explore the surface of Mars

Activity: Designing Spacesuits Mars

7D This lesson focuses on working in space.

Students should watch the videos Working in Space, and How Do You Turn A Bolt In Space? If there is additional time, students can watch additional videos from Living in Space – Work site

Video: Working in Space

Video: How Do You Turn A Bolt in Space?

Link to Videos: Living in Space – Work

Students participate in several activities to show the challenges of working in space

Download: Working in space – educator version

The students should read the article Working in Space

Webpage with Resources and Videos: Space Work

Reading: Working In Space

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At the end of the lesson the teacher leads a brainstorming session of key learning of the day and how these ideas incorporate into the summative project. The students will make jot notes.

8D Everyone wants to know how to go to the bathroom in space. Enclosed are some videos to answer that question.

Video: Going to the Bathroom in Space

Video: Chris Hadfield Going to the Bathroom in Space

In addition, there is a demonstration that addresses the recycling of water as part of living and working in space.

Demonstration: Sweet Pee

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observation
 

At the end of the lesson the teacher leads a brainstorming session of key learning of the day and how these ideas incorporate into the summative project. The students will make jot notes.

9D This lesson deals with the International Space Station.

Students can watch videos on the tour of the International Space Station and Living in Space.

Video: Tour of the International Space Station

Video: Living in Space: Episode One

Video: Living in Space: Episode Two

Video: Living in Space : Episode Three

Enclosed is a lesson on the International Space Station showing that ISS inhabitants perform the daily functions of life in space using special products and procedures.

Lesson Plan: International Space Station

Also enclosed are the blueprints of the International Space Station which the students can use to make models of the station.

Link: Blueprints of the International Space Station to Make Models With

Link: International Space Station Introduction

Link: Space Station Webpage

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At the end of the lesson the teacher leads a brainstorming session of key learning of the day and how these ideas incorporate into the summative project. The students will make jot notes.
GLOSSARY
astronaut Astronauts are people who go into space.
micro-gravity Is the state in which “apparent” gravity is reduced to virtually negligible levels. [For example, when an object is in free fall, it experiences microgravity.]
space suit The life-support suit that astronauts wear when they work in space.
weightlessness Weightlessness (or free fall) is the state in which an object appears to have no weight (but the object’s mass remains the same). During weightlessness, the apparent gravitational pull on an object is negligible (close to zero).
MISCONCEPTIONS
  • There is no gravity in space.
  • Aliens are visiting the earth, and have been doing so in the past.
CANADIAN CONTENT AND CONTRIBUTIONS
  • Canadian astronauts have been part of NASA’s space program, as a result of their expertise in engineering, robotics, and space medicine.
  • In particular, Canadian industry has developed the Canadarm and Dextre; Canadian astronauts are experts in operating these.

 

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